Korean Service
HOME
Purple Heart
     Infantry Weapons     
     THE WHOLE SITE     
     Combat Photos     

The Foundation of Freedom is the Courage of Ordinary People

History  Bert '53  On Line


Browning 9mm FN GP35 Automatic Pistol

The Model 1935 is a recoil operated, locked breech pistol, linkless cam design, with easy balance, natural pointing accuracy, and from 276-574 ft-lb muzzle energy. As with the Tokarev, the lower mass of its bullet and the higher velocity cause much higher drag and energy falloff with distance than our heavy 0.45, but it is still deadly at 25 yards, the usual hand-gun fighting range. The safety locks both sear and slide. The GP was the first military pistol to have a high capacity, staggered column magazine.


TM 23-35 (htm): Combat Training: Pistols & Revolvers

USMC: The Pistol, 1951


Browning 9mm FN GP35 Automatic

Browning 9mm FN GP35 Automatic Pistol

Browning 9mm FN GP35 Automatic
Adams Guns


Browning 9mm FN GP35 Automatic Pistol

Browning 9mm FN GP35 Automatic Pistol


Browning 9mm FN GP35 Automatic Pistol

With shoulder stock

Designed by John M. Browning in 1925, the FN GP35 was patented in 1927, soon after his death. The only sidearm used by both sides in WW2, the HP is still in use well into XXI century, second in useful life only to Browning's Colt 1911.

The GP 35 or Model 1935, is a recoil operated, locked breech pistol, using linkless barrel to slide locking. The safety locks both sear and slide. Original GPs were available with two sight versions - with fixed sights, and rear tangent sights ajustable for distance to 500 meters. Lanyard rings were optional. The GP was the first military pistol to have high capacity, staggered column magazine for 13 rounds plus one loaded in the chamber.

Primary function Semiautomatic pistol
Caliber 9 mm: bullet wt 115 gr, charge 6 gr
Muzzle velocity 1040-1500 fps depending on type and manufacture of ammunition
Muzzle energy 276-574 ft-lb depending on type and manufacture of ammunition
Magazine capacity 13 round, double-line staggered, box
Weight Magazine empty: 2.3 pounds (0.99 kg)
Length Overall 7.75 inches (197mm)
Length of Barrel 4.65 inches (118mm), 4 grooves right hand twist
Max Effective range 82.02 feet (25 meters)

During WWII, many Browning 9mm GP35 pistols were made in Canada by John Inglis & Co of Toronto, and despatched to Nationalist China. During their victory in the Chinese civil war, the CCF captured many of them, and used them during the first year of the Korean War.

The pistol was developed by Fabrique Nationale in 1935 to John Browning's design, and represents an improvement over earlier models such as the M1911 Colt 45. The major difference lies in the disposal of the Colt's hinged link which effects barrel/slide unlocking on the recoil, substituting a shaped cam on the underside of the barrel, which operates against a fixed stud in the frame to do the same job. In addition it has a more comfortable trigger than the Colt stirrup-type. When pressed it rotates a trigger lever forward, rotating the sear lever which acts upon the sear arm, causing it to swivel and release the hammer. Stripping is also somewhat easier, and all early Belgian models, and the Chinese Canadian models, have a slot in the butt which permits fitting of a holster stock.

The GP35 greatest military asset is its unusual magazine capacity -- 13 rounds in a double row. The consequently bulky butt grip, together with an arched lower section of the handle section of the receiver gives the pistol a better than usual instinctive pointing quality. It is easily held and is a most handy weapon in action.

Causes of the Korean Tragedy ... Failure of Leadership, Intelligence and Preparation

        KOREAN WAR TIME LINE         
 
     Tanks and Fighting Vehicles     
 
               Enemy Weapons              

     Korean War, 1950-1953        
 
  Map and Battles of the MLR   
 
                 SEARCH SITE                  


The Foundations of Freedom are the Courage of Ordinary People and Quality of our Arms





-  A   VETERAN's  Blog  -
Today's Issues and History's Lessons


  Guest Book